HUMAN BRAINS are ‘Relatively Young,’ Evolved Only 1.7 Million Years Ago

HUMAN BRAINS are ‘Relatively Young,’ Evolved Only 1.7 Million Years Ago

HUMAN BRAINS are ‘Relatively Young,’ Evolving Only 1.7 Million Years Ago
Photo: Daily Mail UK

A recent study claims that modern human brains are actually ‘relatively young’ and evolved only last 1.7 million years ago. This is after the earliest humans first dispersed from Africa.

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According to Daily Mail, researchers used computed tomography to examine the skulls of Homo fossils found in Africa and Asia.

Results show that human brains are relatively young, which evolved between 1.5-1.7 million years ago in Africa. This is only just a million years before the first Homo sapiens emerged. 

The first population of the genus Homo emerged in Africa about 2.5 million years ago. They also walked upright, but their brains were only about half the size of today’s humans.

Further, they said the human brain became increasingly ompled when the culture of stone evolved. Later on,  the new Homo populations spread from Africa to Southeast Asia.

There are four living classifications of great apes: Orangutan, Gorilla, Pan (consisting of chimpanzee and the bonobo) and Homo, of which only modern humans remain.

HUMAN BRAINS are ‘Relatively Young,’ Evolving Only 1.7 Million Years Ago
Photo: Daily Mail UK

Meanwhile, humans today are different from other apes because we live on the ground, walk on two legs and have much larger brains.

Apart from the size, a human brain is different from other apes specifically in the location and organization of individual brain regions.