Not Brushing TEETH Increases Cancer Risks, 20-year Study Finds

Not Brushing TEETH Increases Cancer Risks, 20-year Study Finds

Not Brushing TEETH Increases Cancer Risks, 20-year Study Finds
Photo: The Daily Mail UK

New study shows a person must regularly brush teeth to cut risks of developing cancer of the mouth or stomach.

According to The Daily Mail, scientists from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health tracked thousands of people for more than 20 years to uncover the link.

Observations show people with the history of gum diseases have 52% more chance of developing esophageal or gastric cancer later in life. Further, risks are higher for those who have lost teeth.

Researchers said gum disease is due to poor oral hygiene. This means a person does not brush teeth “properly or regularly.”

READ: Fixing Your Teeth Could Change Your Life

Not Brushing TEETH Increases Cancer Risks, 20-year Study Finds
Photo: Web MD

They looked over said cancer cases from 98,459 women and 49,685 men over at least two decades.

Among which include 99 cases of esophageal cancer and 238 cases of gastric cancer. Meanwhile, those who lost a tooth or more rated “modestly higher.”

The team linked the case between the bacteria commonly found in the mouth and esophageal cancer. These bacteria include tannerella forsythia and porphyromonas gingivalis.

Meanwhile, US researchers last year suggested having gum disease could raise your risk of getting Alzheimer’s in later life.

The study found that the bacteria which cause bleeding gums can get from the mouth into the brain. Researchers said brushing teeth properly could lower risk of dementia.